Archive for the ‘viaduct’ Tag

LA River bridges tour, part 4

So to finish up my little tour of the LA River bridges downtown, I walked the Olympic Boulevard Viaduct, originally called the Ninth Street Viaduct (1925), and the Washington Boulevard Bridge (1931) on two separate occasions. These two bridges are located just south of the I-10, and carry a fair amount of traffic bound for the vast industrial corridor stretching from downtown to Vernon. Needless to say, like the other bridges, they’ve seen better days and have been extensively retrofitted, but are beautiful structures with lots of details to check out.

The Olympic Boulevard bridge is a rather schizophrenic structure befitting its rather long length (1422′), with two distinct sets of lighting standards, colored two different ways, and a whirling, S-shaped, guardrail pattern along the sidewalk. What’s seen today is the result of a renovation and seismic upgrade in 1998. It crosses the LA River and a set of railroad tracks on the eastern side of the river. It’s been made very colorful by graffiti over the years, with the usual set of parking spaces, homeless encampments, and art canvasses in the areas underneath the bridge.

Olympic Boulevard Bridge, southeast side

Olympic Boulevard Bridge, southeast side

S-pattern, Olympic Boulevard Bridge

S-pattern, Olympic Boulevard Bridge

And this brings us to the final bridge in this walk. The Washington Boulevard Bridge is one of the shortest, and one of the most distinctive. Despite its rather desolate location near a concrete plant, a recycling center, and essentially in the middle of nowhere, it’s an island of elegance amongst the drabness and gray. Then there are the heavy trucks and large vehicles that batter this span on a daily basis, and it’s surprising that it’s survived this long. Most notable is the set of now-faded, but colorful, engineering-oriented, terra cotta friezes decorating the four large pylons on the short (312′) structure.

Pylon with frieze, Washington Boulevard Bridge

Pylon with frieze, Washington Boulevard Bridge

Frieze detail, Washington Boulevard Bridge

Frieze detail, Washington Boulevard Bridge

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LA River bridges tour, part 3

The Sixth Street Viaduct (1932) celebrated its 83rd and last birthday in 2015.

The bridge is scheduled to close on January 3, 2016, and demolition will start five days after that. So after being on life support for years, and deteriorating from within, it’s going to be replaced. I walked it on a day where it was closed to traffic for a film shoot, so it was possible to get a close look without dealing with traffic. The bridge attracts a large number of filmers, photographers, fashion shoots, car rallies below, and in a way, it’s the town square of the Arts District. And on occasion, a few people climb up to the top of the bridge for what must be a pretty, and illegal vantage point.

East entrance, Art Deco flair, now sadly deteriorated.

East entrance, Art Deco flair, now sadly deteriorated.

The bridge has seen much better days, and from old Los Angeles Times photographs, it was clear that the cracks were appearing very soon after its opening. Now the railings are crumbling, the anchorages are separating, and it’s literally falling apart. In certain places it’s possible to see the river below the cracks in the structure. It’s still the most graceful of the spans across the river, immediately recognizable from the theatrical double arches mixed with restrained Art Deco flourishes. Really worth a look is the area around the tunnel leading to the river, which feels like a cathedral if you use your imagination a little. Also look for the patched up sections where engineers tried to slow down the alkali silica reaction that ultimately led to the bridge’s demise.

The fading LA icon, Sixth Street Bridge.

The fading LA icon, Sixth Street Bridge.

This doesn't really give you a secure feeling, it's probably a 4-5 inch space in there with a view of the river channel below.

This doesn’t really give you a secure feeling, it’s probably a 4-5 inch space in there with a view of the river channel below.

I stopped briefly for some coffee on Mateo Street, which seems to be the epicenter of the Arts District these days, once creepy, now uber-trendy and busy with pedestrian traffic. And then it was on to the 7th Street Bridge, a much less spectacular structure from the roadway. This bridge links LA’s once-thriving downtown retail corridor 7th Street with Boyle Heights. What’s interesting about this bridge is that it was constructed in two phases. The lower deck came first (1910), and as the traffic demands increased, a second upper deck (1927) was built and the lower one abandoned. The lower level is now barely accessible, gated off, and is a roof for numerous homeless residents of the city. The bridge is better viewed from the river (walk through the 6th Street Bridge access tunnel and turn south), where the engineering behind it is clear.

7th Street Bridge, two parts built 17 years apart, but looking pretty cohesive overall.

7th Street Bridge, two parts built 17 years apart, but looking pretty cohesive overall.

Then it was uphill, as 7th Street passes under numerous freeway lanes, climbs steeply, and meets a traffic light at Boyle Avenue at the crest. My walk came to an end at the landmark Sears on Olympic Boulevard, which is now pretty empty save for a small retail section that somehow hangs on. It’s a time warp building that’s preserved the old signage and neon. Pretty much my feet were battered from 11 miles of walking on the rough surfaces, especially the last section that crossed over the very large, complicated 5 / 60 / 10 interchange.

Next part in this series, the bridges south of I-10, Olympic Boulevard Bridge and Washington Boulevard Bridge. I walked these on two separate occasions, and they’re unique, rarely explored places hidden among the warehouses, grime, and heavy truck traffic. Stay tuned.

 

Sixth Street Viaduct, Los Angeles

Another post about a doomed structure.

This is LA’s grandest bridge, and at 3500 feet in length, the longest span over the industrial LA River basin. The Sixth Street Viaduct (Bridge) is one of the city’s most recognized landmarks, seen in countless movies, commercials, and photos. There’s usually someone filming in the river basin below, and plenty of photographers in the area, despite the rather desolate setting of the immediate area. Technically, it’s a viaduct, crossing the river and several 1950s-era freeway spans before becoming Whittier Blvd. in Boyle Heights. The design is classic Art Deco, with a graceful, asymmetric double arch where it bends and crosses the river. The eastern entrance is a modified, angled obelisk, with a classic view of downtown LA in the distance.

Soaring over the industrial flats east of the LA River.

Soaring over the industrial flats east of the LA River.

It’s also crumbling, the concrete mix used in construction was faulty, and the structure was deteriorating from the start. The bridge was completed in 1932, and demolition will start in summer 2015. Fortunately, the replacement bridge is a stunning design with a clear nod to the old one.

View from near Santa Fe Avenue.

View from near Santa Fe Avenue, January 2014.

LA skyline from the bridge.

LA skyline from the bridge.

A closeup view shows lots of loose concrete, plenty of cracks, and structural damage. The structural problems led to many changes in the architecture of the bridge over the years. The fancy central pylon was removed a few years after completion, and the piers at the ends of the arches were shortened.

The Sixth Street Bridge as is appeared shortly after completion. Note Art Deco central pylon. Photo from LA Public Library collection.

The Sixth Street Bridge as is appeared shortly after completion. Note Art Deco central pylon. Photo from LA Public Library collection.

The bridge as it appeared in 1950, photo by William Reagh, from the LA Public Library collection. Central pylon has been removed.

The bridge as it appeared in 1950, with the central pylon removed. Photo by William Reagh, from the LA Public Library collection.