Archive for the ‘dtla’ Tag

Across LA: Olympic Boulevard

Each year the Great Los Angeles Walk picks a crosstown major arterial, and in November 2015 it was Olympic Boulevard. So walk 16 miles across a city reputed for being pedestrian unfriendly? Why not? I spent many weekends in LA in 2015, exploring the bridges, the hidden sidewalks, the stairways, and got a new appreciation for a city I’ve always loved.

So I met up with a rather large crowd at the recently renovated, kitschy Clifton’s Cafeteria on Broadway, which opened an hour early just for this event. And after some introductory remarks, we were off. The route was initially south on Broadway, then a jog over to Main Street and Olympic, and then it was due west for a good 7-8 hours until we met up with the beach at Santa Monica. Like many of the main arterials, Olympic is a slice of the ethnic diversity of the city, much of it felt in the first 3 miles of the route where it’s a spectacular collision of Korea and Latin America, visually stimulating and chaotic. The rest of it is less interesting, passing through the rather pedestrian-unfriendly Century City and a few historic neighborhoods and HPOZ (historic preservation overlay zones) near Beverly Hills. The stretch within Beverly Hills is extensive, but is a world away from the Beverly Hills that is seen on TV and in the movies- it’s the middle-class, unexceptional side of the city, and mostly residential. The demographic is mostly upscale after Koreatown, including neighborhoods like Rancho Park, Country Club Park, and Santa Monica.

I was one of the slower ones, stopping at a friend’s house to chat, then stopping for a leisurely lunch at the legendary Tom Bergin’s about midway through the walk.

A good way to start the walk, beautiful blue skies and morning light on the Eastern Columbia building on Broadway

A good way to start the walk, beautiful blue skies and morning light on the Eastern Columbia building on Broadway

Clifton's Cafeteria on Broadway, recently and beautifully restored

Clifton’s Cafeteria on Broadway, recently and beautifully restored

Commercial chaos, Olympic and Western

Commercial chaos, Olympic and Western

Persian flavor, Westside

Persian flavor, Westside

Helios House, the future of the gas station!

Helios House, the future of the gas station! Olympic and Robertson

Century Plaza Towers, Minoru Yamasaki (1975)

Century Plaza Towers, Minoru Yamasaki (1975)

Well, most of the crowd did not make it all the way back to the beach, I got there just after sunset, my legs and feet sore from a crazy walk across town. Never done it before, can’t wait to do it again, there’s no better way to explore the City of Angels.

Santa Monica, fading daylight, are we there yet?

Santa Monica, fading daylight, are we there yet?

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Last days of the Sixth Street Bridge, Los Angeles

I visited LA quite a bit in 2015, spending many happy days wandering around the diverse neighborhoods and landscapes of the city. The Sixth Street Viaduct, generally called the Sixth Street Bridge, was the doomed landmark that I spent plenty of time up close and personal. My last visit was New Years weekend, 2016, which was supposed to be the final weekend it would be open to traffic. It turned out that the closure was delayed by a couple weeks longer, but it was essentially the bridge’s last stand, showing all the battering, use, abuse, and love of its 83 years.

There really was no way to save the bridge. The disrepair and decay of the concrete really showed, and it was continuing to deteriorate. Had the concrete not been faulty, perhaps it would have lasted longer. But despite the loss of this landmark, the replacement bridge is a thoughtful nod to the old one, and will be LA’s newest showpiece when it’s completed.

Sixth Street Bridge and the downtown skyline, January 2, 2016. A now-lost view.

Sixth Street Bridge and the downtown skyline, January 2, 2016. A now-lost view.

A bit of calm along the river. The scene was actually pretty busy, with a steady stream of cars, visitors, and photographers.

A bit of calm along the river. The scene was actually pretty busy, with a steady stream of cars, visitors, and photographers.

That bit of elegance among the drabness of the industrial flats.

That bit of elegance among the drabness of the industrial flats.

And a bit of abstraction. . .

Walking back to Santa Fe Avenue, goodbye!

LA River bridges tour, part 2

My tour continued east past the vast complex of jails, bail bond businesses, and led to the Cesar Chavez Avenue Bridge, once known as the Macy Street Bridge (1926). It’s a very elegant structure, with a neo-Spanish theme, probably one of my favorites. The theme here is the curve, right-handed, left-handed, scrolls, you name it.

Cesar Chavez Avenue Bridge

Cesar Chavez Avenue Bridge

More curves, decorative guardrails

More curves, decorative guardrails

I turned right (south) at the traffic light, and crossed under the freeway, past some more public housing, and this brought me to the 1st Street Bridge (1929). It’s also a reconstruction, widened recently to accommodate the new streetcar line between Union Station and East Los Angeles. It marks the northern end of the Arts District, with the very long, ambitious One Santa Fe mixed-use complex (Michael Maltzan) abutting the bridge. It’s the anchor of the district, echoing the horizontal nature of the area, think railroad tracks, railyards, the LA River, and Sci-Arc across the street.

View south from the 1st Street Bridge

View south from the 1st Street Bridge

The 4th Street Bridge (1930) is getting a bit crumbly. I crossed under the bridge on Santa Fe Avenue, and went up the west side staircase. It’s normally a pretty messy stairway, either with broken glass or human waste, or people sleeping there. It was somewhat clean for a change this time around. Unlike its neighbors to the north, the bridge has a distinct Art Deco theme to it, with clean, sober lines throughout, mixed in with a funky decorative guardrails. Like many of the bridges, there are these large decorative towers / alcoves, which were probably intended as viewpoints and places to sit. But they’ve turned into informal dumps, not surprising given that pedestrian traffic is pretty minimal and the area is a magnet for the homeless, pushed further east by a gentrifying downtown.

4th Street Bridge from below, retrofitted, but sporting plenty of vegetation

4th Street Bridge from below, retrofitted, but sporting plenty of vegetation

Crumbling light fixture, 4th Street Bridge

Crumbling light fixture, 4th Street Bridge

 

Los Angeles River bridge walk

The LA River cuts through the eastern edge of downtown Los Angeles, deep in a concrete jungle of warehouses, trendy lofts, America’s largest Skid Row, and some of the busiest commercial areas of the city. A series of historic bridges were built in the early 20th century, to provide essential infrastructure, but also to re-build after disastrous flooding along the river. The channel itself was covered in concrete mid-century, so very few traces of the wooded, meandering river still exist.

Downtown, from north to south, it starts with the complex of bridges of the Arroyo Seco Parkway and the unusual sidewalk that straddles the northbound and southbound lanes of the 110. I’ve written about that in a previous post. South of this are the Broadway, Spring, North Main, Cesar Chavez, 1st, 4th, 6th, 7th, Olympic Blvd., and Washington Blvd. bridges, ranging from the modest to the grand, built between 1905 and 1933. They’re perhaps the most hidden and underappreciated structures of the city, beautifully detailed, but mercilessly spray painted, graffitied, and covered in trash. They are also the most viewed structures in the city, appearing in countless commercials and movies. Seismically, they were built before current earthquake code, and many aspects of the bridges have been modified, or copied, or widened. So in classic LA fashion, they look unchanged from a distance, but up close, the changes, makeup, and restoration really show. The development of the Arts District on the west side of the river and the slow gentrification of Boyle Heights on the east, has brought the bridges back in focus, and they are busy creative spaces. It’s easy to find a fashion or film shoot going on at any hour, but also easy to find solitary, creepy zones.

I put together a route that links the bridges in downtown LA, which can be found in the link below, and walked them in June 2015. I’ll try to post on my walk in a future entry on this blog. Happy exploring!