Archive for the ‘california’ Tag

Murphy Ranch, Los Angeles

Murphy Ranch was one of LA’s strangest places, a compound located in the Santa Monica Mountain foothills above Brentwood. It’s accessed by a two mile hike on a fire road, followed by a bunch of stairs leading down to the bottom of the canyon, leading to a colorful group of ruins. Details of the property, owners, and motives are pretty fuzzy and have been embellished over the years. It’s a reputed self-sufficient compound for a small group of Nazi sympathizers who purchased the land in the early 1930s and recruited a couple of wealthy donors to their cause, who then built some of the structures. This all came to a halt as a result of the war and finances. But that’s besides the point of this post. It now lays in ruins and the City has demolished some of the unstable structures since my visit. The graffiti is colorful, the grounds liberally covered in broken glass and all sorts of leftover spray cans left by the “artists”, and a lot of the structures are rusted and crumbling. I guess you could consider this to be urban exploring lite.

Still life with spray cans

Abandoned water tank

Overhanging ladder, I couldn’t quite deal with climbing this one

Need to step carefully, and keep your tetanus shots up to date!

Advertisements

Across LA: Olympic Boulevard

Each year the Great Los Angeles Walk picks a crosstown major arterial, and in November 2015 it was Olympic Boulevard. So walk 16 miles across a city reputed for being pedestrian unfriendly? Why not? I spent many weekends in LA in 2015, exploring the bridges, the hidden sidewalks, the stairways, and got a new appreciation for a city I’ve always loved.

So I met up with a rather large crowd at the recently renovated, kitschy Clifton’s Cafeteria on Broadway, which opened an hour early just for this event. And after some introductory remarks, we were off. The route was initially south on Broadway, then a jog over to Main Street and Olympic, and then it was due west for a good 7-8 hours until we met up with the beach at Santa Monica. Like many of the main arterials, Olympic is a slice of the ethnic diversity of the city, much of it felt in the first 3 miles of the route where it’s a spectacular collision of Korea and Latin America, visually stimulating and chaotic. The rest of it is less interesting, passing through the rather pedestrian-unfriendly Century City and a few historic neighborhoods and HPOZ (historic preservation overlay zones) near Beverly Hills. The stretch within Beverly Hills is extensive, but is a world away from the Beverly Hills that is seen on TV and in the movies- it’s the middle-class, unexceptional side of the city, and mostly residential. The demographic is mostly upscale after Koreatown, including neighborhoods like Rancho Park, Country Club Park, and Santa Monica.

I was one of the slower ones, stopping at a friend’s house to chat, then stopping for a leisurely lunch at the legendary Tom Bergin’s about midway through the walk.

A good way to start the walk, beautiful blue skies and morning light on the Eastern Columbia building on Broadway

A good way to start the walk, beautiful blue skies and morning light on the Eastern Columbia building on Broadway

Clifton's Cafeteria on Broadway, recently and beautifully restored

Clifton’s Cafeteria on Broadway, recently and beautifully restored

Commercial chaos, Olympic and Western

Commercial chaos, Olympic and Western

Persian flavor, Westside

Persian flavor, Westside

Helios House, the future of the gas station!

Helios House, the future of the gas station! Olympic and Robertson

Century Plaza Towers, Minoru Yamasaki (1975)

Century Plaza Towers, Minoru Yamasaki (1975)

Well, most of the crowd did not make it all the way back to the beach, I got there just after sunset, my legs and feet sore from a crazy walk across town. Never done it before, can’t wait to do it again, there’s no better way to explore the City of Angels.

Santa Monica, fading daylight, are we there yet?

Santa Monica, fading daylight, are we there yet?

Last days of the Sixth Street Bridge, Los Angeles

I visited LA quite a bit in 2015, spending many happy days wandering around the diverse neighborhoods and landscapes of the city. The Sixth Street Viaduct, generally called the Sixth Street Bridge, was the doomed landmark that I spent plenty of time up close and personal. My last visit was New Years weekend, 2016, which was supposed to be the final weekend it would be open to traffic. It turned out that the closure was delayed by a couple weeks longer, but it was essentially the bridge’s last stand, showing all the battering, use, abuse, and love of its 83 years.

There really was no way to save the bridge. The disrepair and decay of the concrete really showed, and it was continuing to deteriorate. Had the concrete not been faulty, perhaps it would have lasted longer. But despite the loss of this landmark, the replacement bridge is a thoughtful nod to the old one, and will be LA’s newest showpiece when it’s completed.

Sixth Street Bridge and the downtown skyline, January 2, 2016. A now-lost view.

Sixth Street Bridge and the downtown skyline, January 2, 2016. A now-lost view.

A bit of calm along the river. The scene was actually pretty busy, with a steady stream of cars, visitors, and photographers.

A bit of calm along the river. The scene was actually pretty busy, with a steady stream of cars, visitors, and photographers.

That bit of elegance among the drabness of the industrial flats.

That bit of elegance among the drabness of the industrial flats.

And a bit of abstraction. . .

Walking back to Santa Fe Avenue, goodbye!

Mt. Whitney day hike

I’ve run out of stuff to blog about, since my traveling is pretty limited these days.

So I’ll give some details about my late summer day hike of Mt. Whitney back in September 2015. It’s a commonly climbed peak in the Sierra Nevada, since it’s the highest point in the contiguous 48 states, at an elevation of 14505′ (4421 m), and there’s a trail all the way to the top. The trail and Whitney Zone is subject to restrictions on use, and given the fragile state of the ecosystem and plenty of unprepared hikers, it’s probably a good thing. I think that there would be lots of people being peeled off the trail and the summit by rescue squads.

Now about the permit. I had no trouble getting one at the Interagency Visitor Center, at the junction of CA 190 and US 395, for the following day. But I also spent a good 15-20 minutes thinking about whether to punish myself like this. The weather was reminiscent of my first (two-day) hike of Whitney in 2003, hot and dry in Lone Pine, almost excessively hot. And since I’m getting older, I’m not sure how many more times I’ll be able to do this.

To put it in a few words: it kicked my ass. None of the trail is steep, but the length, a hefty 22 mile round trip with 6500 feet of elevation gain, including a brief uphill back up to Trail Crest on the way back, makes this a pretty serious undertaking. I started at 4:30 AM, and was back at the car by 6 PM, as the temperature was dropping and the daylight fading. Still, the weather was very stable and warm, with a temperature nearing 50 F at the summit, and nearly no wind. Having hiked a number of 14ers in Colorado, this one still took in excess of 13 hours. I thought I was prepared? Get an early start, and I mean early, like 3-4 AM, and don’t forget the headlamp.

Dawn above Lone Pine Lake

Dawn above Lone Pine Lake

The trail is more like a freeway, and really gets going after you arrive at the last lake (and water source). This is where the switchbacks start, and honestly, it’s too many. I didn’t bother counting how many, but it’s more than the 99 advertised. After all that, the trail levels off and traverses across a slope to Trail Crest (13600′, 4145 m) and the entrance into Sequoia National Park. Yay, you’re there! Not really, you head downhill to a junction with the John Muir Trail, and it’s still another 2 miles to the summit.

Looking towards Owens Valley

Looking towards Owens Valley

Home stretch, just past Trail Crest, also really tiring!

Home stretch, just past Trail Crest, also really tiring!

Summit view, looking south towards Mt. Langley

Summit view, looking south towards Mt. Langley

September is a pretty good time to hike. I’ve done this twice now, and both times were in mid-to-late September. While the days are shorter, the temps stay warm, there’s less competition for permits, fewer bugs, and generally stable weather. There are brief sections on the “99 switchbacks” that stay icy, so watch out. A good rule of thumb is that the summit temps are 40-50 F cooler than in Lone Pine.

I slept in Lone Pine, since this was an unplanned hike. By all means, get a decent place to sleep after your hike, I chose the Dow Villa historic property in Lone Pine. Before your hike, I suggest trying to sleep a bit higher up, like near the Portal. As for the other stuff. . .

Another hint: do this as a 2-3 day hike, it’s way more fun, and you’ll have more time to soak in the scenery. I was too busy being tired to really digest it all. What I should have brought: more food. A banana, orange, and beef jerky is not nearly enough. I essentially went with a light breakfast and nearly nothing else. Not the best idea. More drinks: the two bottles of energy drinks and 1.5 L of water are not quite enough either. The energy drinks did have the electrolytes that kept me from completely malfunctioning. Not surprisingly, I conked out on the way down and fell asleep at for 15 minutes, at 14000 feet.

It’s a beautiful hike, and the minimalist landscape above treeline is special. Up there, it’s just the blinding granite and the deep blue of the many lakes dotting the High Sierra. Have fun hiking, but by all means, be prepared, I wasn’t quite ready and was fortunate to summit.

 

 

 

Summer of 14ers

Five years ago, I hiked my first Colorado 14er, which was a difficult but straightforward ridgeline climb up to the top of Quandary Peak. These are the set of 58 (give or take a few) peaks that top the 14000′ mark in Colorado. Each of them are difficult, marked by steep trails that often gain 1000 vertical / mile, at high altitude. After completing a series of so-called ‘easy’ 14ers over a two-day period in September 2010, I swore them off, vowing to never hike another one again.

OK, so that didn’t last too long. I made summer trips to Colorado in 2011 and 2012, and hiked Mt. Elbert in October 2012, which felt like an epic undertaking. After moving to the Rockies in the summer of 2013, I found an enthusiastic hiking partner and over the next two summers, we added a few more peaks to our lists. I had stood on top of 14 of them by the end of 2014, and my buddy moved back east.

I set a goal to get back in shape and hike an average of 3000′ / week. For the most part, I soloed most of these, and got off my ass enough to drive the 300 miles to access the trailheads. The driving is not that fun, but like most things, you get used to it. My car is also not equipped for sleeping, as I have to twist myself into unusual shapes to fit. In any case, I roughly doubled my total, repeated a few peaks, and have to admit that it was a great summer. Here are a few of my notes and observations, I definitely felt in shape by the end of the summer, and did enough of them that I had a good idea about how to pace myself, and what to expect on the way up. Still, they all hold little surprises and the views are really pretty. Each hike / climb is a story, and some are epics.

June 28: Grays and Torreys Peaks. This is the among the most accessible 14ers, lying just a couple miles off of I-70, and the ease of access shows in the very heavy crowds. I opted to park at the interstate exit, and hitched a ride up to the trailhead. From there it was a pretty straightforward ascent to the top of Grays, and another clear trail up Torreys. For the first time at elevation this summer, it’s a good one to start with and get back in shape.

July 3: Huron Peak. This was the only one that I hiked with a partner, that I hooked up with via 14ers.com. We took a circuitous route to the summit via an old fire road that was literally sliding down the mountain. So it offered pretty amazing views, and a fair amount of off-trail travel to join back up with the standard route. I was hardly able to make it up the last 200 feet, which was a very steep climb on a very busy trail. The summit views are probably the best out of the 14ers I’ve been on so far, as it’s deep in the Sawatch and far from any paved roads, and despite its prominence and distinct shape, it’s pretty hidden.

July 11: Mts. Cameron, Lincoln, Bross, South Bross, Bierstadt. I went as an afterthought, after a friend emailed me and said that he was hiking the so-called DeCaLiBro loop with some students of his. I was going to meet them somewhere along the trail, but turned towards Lincoln at the saddle, and it turned out they were still on Democrat, in the other direction. These peaks are all ‘easy’ ones, but turned into an all day effort. Given that it was a Saturday morning, they were crowded. I pulled into Kite Lake at 7 AM and ended up walking a half mile to get to the trailhead. The access road is pretty rough and narrow at the end, take it easy. This loop attracts everyone, including an older couple that I took to the trailhead. They had driven from Minnesota to check this off their bucket list; he was in between cancer treatments. I don’t know whether they summited, after I passed them on the trail up to the Democrat / Cameron saddle. These are unexceptional summits, mostly just rounded piles of rocks and fairly easy traverses between the peaks.

I checked the radar and it was already showing rain in the vicinity, but forecasted some clearing later in the day. So I headed up Guanella Pass road and parked at the Bierstadt trailhead. This one was also completely full, and despite being in the Mt. Evans Wilderness, it was anything but. Now I was headed up when everyone else was headed down, slowed my pace, checked out the blooming flowers, and the weather slowly cleared. The trail also cleared, and I shared the summit with a total of two other people, in a beautiful late afternoon light. But hey, I was pretty tired by that point, having hit nearly 5900′ vertical.

July 18: Castle Peak. This was my first attempt in the Elks, didn’t summit, there was this pesky snowfield at the top with loose rock and I was pretty sketched out. It’s rated as a difficult class 2 hike, but it had a few moves that scared me enough, and the weather quickly deteriorated, so I turned back 50′ from the top. The rain turned into a pretty good downpour by the time I got back to my car. This was my first did-not-summit 14er, and I guess this seems to happen on this peak quite a bit.

July 25: Redcloud and Sunshine Peaks. It’s accessed via a shelf road that goes west from Lake City, but is passable by most passenger vehicles up to the trailhead. I drove it at night, which spares one from viewing what turned out to be a very steep dropoff. This was an excellent hike, made better by the wildflower display along the way, and the view from the top was wonderful, with the red rock of the summits contrasting with the green below. It’s on the somewhat long side, 12 miles or so round trip with a re-summit of Redcloud on the way back. But it was also one of the most stable weather days in the San Juans, warm and sunny from start to finish, and no thunderstorms. So I lingered and probably spent more time on the way back than on the way up.

August 8: Mt. Yale. This is one incredibly well-maintained trail, more like a freeway up to the last section, which is a not-to-difficult scramble. I’d say that this felt like my best-paced summit, a solid, deliberately paced, three hours up without too much soreness the day afterwards. The weather didn’t quite cooperate, with some good wind at the saddle and a losing battle between the fog and sun. So while there wasn’t much of a view, the weather did finally clear up a bit on the descent, offering a hint of what could be seen.

August 9: Bonus, Ice Lakes Basin, this is Colorado’s most stunning location, and I caught it at the peak of wildflower season. Dump my ashes here when I’m dead. It doesn’t come for free, requiring a 2500+ elevation gain to reach the basin. Like the best hikes, this one starts deep in a moist forest, and saves the best for last. The previous year, I hiked this in late June, which was too early, since the lakes were still thawing out, and the wildflowers hadn’t bloomed yet. I also hiked it barefoot as a (rather painful) stunt- there are some pretty rocky sections, but also some dirt sections that were great to hike on. Last year this did involve a few hundred feet walking through melting snowfields, which was a treat.

Island Lake, Ice Lakes Basin

Island Lake, Ice Lakes Basin

August 29: Castle Peak #2. Again I was held back from the second part of the combo, Conundrum. I had to hike from the end of the paved road, which added far too much distance to the hike. It’s a slog up the road, then slow going from the end of the road through this talus field to the basin with the small lake of snowmelt. Then a trail cuts its way up to the ridgeline, and it’s scrambling and routefinding from that point on. The last section requires some thinking, and is probably best done by climbing straight over the last vertical band of rocks. It’s the most stable of the peaks in the Elks, I don’t want to imagine how loose and hazardous the Bells and Pyramid Peak are.

Conundrum Peak from the top of Castle Peak

Conundrum Peak from the top of Castle Peak

September 6: Mt. Humboldt. The hike was nothing exceptional, much of it along a now-closed 4WD road. The lakes pale in comparison to those inky colored lakes in California’s Sierra, but the views of the Crestone group are amazing. They’re really Colorado’s answer to the High Sierra, although with far less vertical relief. It’s just rather long, and hiking on a 4WD road generally isn’t that much fun.

September 12: Mt. Sneffels, standard route. This one’s short and sweet, and it was pretty busy on a very warm late summer day. The V-notch at the end is more of a squeeze, the exposure is definitely there, but brief. After that, it’s a pretty straightfoward path to the top on a moderate grade on solid rock. The lower gully is loose and unpleasant, though, and it’s best to stick to the sides for any semblance of traction. I’ll opt for the other ridgeline route next time.

September 19: Mt. Whitney, California. This was a spur of the moment decision. My original intention was to hike either White Mountain Peak or Mt. Langley, but I wasn’t too keen on isolated hiking. Each of them are pretty long, and White Mountain Peak is one very remote location. So, I stopped by the visitor’s center in Lone Pine and asked half jokingly whether there were still day hiking permits available. The answer was yes, and I spent a good 15 minutes thinking about whether to punish myself on a very long trail. The weather was going to be very nice all day, with similar temperatures to the day I first summited 12 years ago, and the difference here was that it would be an extra 4+ miles. I took the plunge, filled out the paperwork, and had a day hike permit for the following day. This one took the cake for vertical, with about 6500′ feet uphill and a 22 mile round-trip. Needless to say, despite the lack of steep grades, this one took the most out of me. The upgrade on the flight back to Denver was a treat, as I got to experience one of United’s brand new 787-9 aircraft.

Geology of the Sierra on display, Mt. Whitney trail

Geology of the Sierra on display, Mt. Whitney trail

October 3: Wetterhorn. Wow, this was a thrill. It’s got an exposed last section, where you really do climb up to a very small summit plateau. The fun really begins after gaining the ridge and passing this yellowish patch. The first part is rather loose and crumbly, and not exactly easygoing. After getting past the Prow, you climb through this notch and then down this angled slab, and are faced with the last 150′. It’s a steep ladder. This was my first class 3 route, and I started late, being the last person to summit that day in mid-afternoon, and not seeing anyone else for a good 4 hours. These were truly solo, and it was not a place to get lost or get injured. In retrospect it was perhaps foolish, but since I made it up there, had the trail entirely to myself on the way down, it was probably the most satisfying of the summits.

The last 150' to the summit of Wetterhorn, exposed and thrilling.

The last 150′ to the summit of Wetterhorn, exposed and thrilling.

October 10: Mt. Dana, California. Okay, a 13er, but it was convenient and after spending enough time at altitude, it didn’t feel so hard, despite still topping out at 13061′. I managed a quick time of 1:45 up, more to compensate for a late start and getting down before dark.

October 17: Mt. Shavano, Tabeguache Peak. Who would have thought the weather was going to stay balmy? I finished the Shavano / Tabeguache combo, after only summiting Shavano back in September 2013. I started to feel it on the last push to Shavano’s summit from the saddle, and headed straight for Tabeguache since the clouds were rolling in. It turned out to be a false alarm, luckily it didn’t rain or get any worse than just being overcast. The way up Tabeguache is rather steep, and re-summiting Shavano was not too terrible since it’s a fairly gentle grade back up. The views are nice, but they’re pretty unexceptional summits overall. Much of the Sawatch Range is that way, rounded mountains with mostly identical ascents in the 4000-5000′ feet range, and 8-11 mile round trips. They’re the bread and butter of Colorado’s 14ers.

So this leaves me with the more difficult ones, and hopefully I’ll be able to partner up with more experienced people in the following summers. I’m also looking forward to more wildflower displays, since that was probably the best part of the Colorado summer season, aside from hiking the mountains themselves.

 

 

LA River bridges tour, part 4

So to finish up my little tour of the LA River bridges downtown, I walked the Olympic Boulevard Viaduct, originally called the Ninth Street Viaduct (1925), and the Washington Boulevard Bridge (1931) on two separate occasions. These two bridges are located just south of the I-10, and carry a fair amount of traffic bound for the vast industrial corridor stretching from downtown to Vernon. Needless to say, like the other bridges, they’ve seen better days and have been extensively retrofitted, but are beautiful structures with lots of details to check out.

The Olympic Boulevard bridge is a rather schizophrenic structure befitting its rather long length (1422′), with two distinct sets of lighting standards, colored two different ways, and a whirling, S-shaped, guardrail pattern along the sidewalk. What’s seen today is the result of a renovation and seismic upgrade in 1998. It crosses the LA River and a set of railroad tracks on the eastern side of the river. It’s been made very colorful by graffiti over the years, with the usual set of parking spaces, homeless encampments, and art canvasses in the areas underneath the bridge.

Olympic Boulevard Bridge, southeast side

Olympic Boulevard Bridge, southeast side

S-pattern, Olympic Boulevard Bridge

S-pattern, Olympic Boulevard Bridge

And this brings us to the final bridge in this walk. The Washington Boulevard Bridge is one of the shortest, and one of the most distinctive. Despite its rather desolate location near a concrete plant, a recycling center, and essentially in the middle of nowhere, it’s an island of elegance amongst the drabness and gray. Then there are the heavy trucks and large vehicles that batter this span on a daily basis, and it’s surprising that it’s survived this long. Most notable is the set of now-faded, but colorful, engineering-oriented, terra cotta friezes decorating the four large pylons on the short (312′) structure.

Pylon with frieze, Washington Boulevard Bridge

Pylon with frieze, Washington Boulevard Bridge

Frieze detail, Washington Boulevard Bridge

Frieze detail, Washington Boulevard Bridge

LA River bridges tour, part 3

The Sixth Street Viaduct (1932) celebrated its 83rd and last birthday in 2015.

The bridge is scheduled to close on January 3, 2016, and demolition will start five days after that. So after being on life support for years, and deteriorating from within, it’s going to be replaced. I walked it on a day where it was closed to traffic for a film shoot, so it was possible to get a close look without dealing with traffic. The bridge attracts a large number of filmers, photographers, fashion shoots, car rallies below, and in a way, it’s the town square of the Arts District. And on occasion, a few people climb up to the top of the bridge for what must be a pretty, and illegal vantage point.

East entrance, Art Deco flair, now sadly deteriorated.

East entrance, Art Deco flair, now sadly deteriorated.

The bridge has seen much better days, and from old Los Angeles Times photographs, it was clear that the cracks were appearing very soon after its opening. Now the railings are crumbling, the anchorages are separating, and it’s literally falling apart. In certain places it’s possible to see the river below the cracks in the structure. It’s still the most graceful of the spans across the river, immediately recognizable from the theatrical double arches mixed with restrained Art Deco flourishes. Really worth a look is the area around the tunnel leading to the river, which feels like a cathedral if you use your imagination a little. Also look for the patched up sections where engineers tried to slow down the alkali silica reaction that ultimately led to the bridge’s demise.

The fading LA icon, Sixth Street Bridge.

The fading LA icon, Sixth Street Bridge.

This doesn't really give you a secure feeling, it's probably a 4-5 inch space in there with a view of the river channel below.

This doesn’t really give you a secure feeling, it’s probably a 4-5 inch space in there with a view of the river channel below.

I stopped briefly for some coffee on Mateo Street, which seems to be the epicenter of the Arts District these days, once creepy, now uber-trendy and busy with pedestrian traffic. And then it was on to the 7th Street Bridge, a much less spectacular structure from the roadway. This bridge links LA’s once-thriving downtown retail corridor 7th Street with Boyle Heights. What’s interesting about this bridge is that it was constructed in two phases. The lower deck came first (1910), and as the traffic demands increased, a second upper deck (1927) was built and the lower one abandoned. The lower level is now barely accessible, gated off, and is a roof for numerous homeless residents of the city. The bridge is better viewed from the river (walk through the 6th Street Bridge access tunnel and turn south), where the engineering behind it is clear.

7th Street Bridge, two parts built 17 years apart, but looking pretty cohesive overall.

7th Street Bridge, two parts built 17 years apart, but looking pretty cohesive overall.

Then it was uphill, as 7th Street passes under numerous freeway lanes, climbs steeply, and meets a traffic light at Boyle Avenue at the crest. My walk came to an end at the landmark Sears on Olympic Boulevard, which is now pretty empty save for a small retail section that somehow hangs on. It’s a time warp building that’s preserved the old signage and neon. Pretty much my feet were battered from 11 miles of walking on the rough surfaces, especially the last section that crossed over the very large, complicated 5 / 60 / 10 interchange.

Next part in this series, the bridges south of I-10, Olympic Boulevard Bridge and Washington Boulevard Bridge. I walked these on two separate occasions, and they’re unique, rarely explored places hidden among the warehouses, grime, and heavy truck traffic. Stay tuned.

 

LA River bridges tour, part 2

My tour continued east past the vast complex of jails, bail bond businesses, and led to the Cesar Chavez Avenue Bridge, once known as the Macy Street Bridge (1926). It’s a very elegant structure, with a neo-Spanish theme, probably one of my favorites. The theme here is the curve, right-handed, left-handed, scrolls, you name it.

Cesar Chavez Avenue Bridge

Cesar Chavez Avenue Bridge

More curves, decorative guardrails

More curves, decorative guardrails

I turned right (south) at the traffic light, and crossed under the freeway, past some more public housing, and this brought me to the 1st Street Bridge (1929). It’s also a reconstruction, widened recently to accommodate the new streetcar line between Union Station and East Los Angeles. It marks the northern end of the Arts District, with the very long, ambitious One Santa Fe mixed-use complex (Michael Maltzan) abutting the bridge. It’s the anchor of the district, echoing the horizontal nature of the area, think railroad tracks, railyards, the LA River, and Sci-Arc across the street.

View south from the 1st Street Bridge

View south from the 1st Street Bridge

The 4th Street Bridge (1930) is getting a bit crumbly. I crossed under the bridge on Santa Fe Avenue, and went up the west side staircase. It’s normally a pretty messy stairway, either with broken glass or human waste, or people sleeping there. It was somewhat clean for a change this time around. Unlike its neighbors to the north, the bridge has a distinct Art Deco theme to it, with clean, sober lines throughout, mixed in with a funky decorative guardrails. Like many of the bridges, there are these large decorative towers / alcoves, which were probably intended as viewpoints and places to sit. But they’ve turned into informal dumps, not surprising given that pedestrian traffic is pretty minimal and the area is a magnet for the homeless, pushed further east by a gentrifying downtown.

4th Street Bridge from below, retrofitted, but sporting plenty of vegetation

4th Street Bridge from below, retrofitted, but sporting plenty of vegetation

Crumbling light fixture, 4th Street Bridge

Crumbling light fixture, 4th Street Bridge

 

LA River bridges tour, part 1

Los Angeles is a wonderful walking city, rough around the edges, but I think it’s best seen on foot. Plus, there are a lot of pedestrians, and plenty of people taking the underrated public transit system.

In my previous post, I outlined a walk that took in the variety of the bridges that cross the LA River downtown. It threads through mostly older neighborhoods and industrial areas just east of the downtown core. In early June 2015, I took a walking tour of most of the downtown bridges, so here’s part of the tour. The typical June gloom day was ideal for walking around, since there’s very little shade in this part of town, keeping the temperatures, and the temperature of the pavement, tolerable.

Of course, not following my own advice, I drove into downtown and parked at Union Station. I started by going north on Alameda Street, which then blended into Spring Street and headed in a rough northeast direction down a busy traffic thoroughfare, though sparse with walkers like me. About a mile north of Union Station is the short North Spring Street Bridge (1928), part of a closely spaced trio of bridges, each of them fairly similar in their design. This one is being retrofitted right now.

North Spring Street Bridge (1928), and the very apocalyptic landscape of the LA River

North Spring Street Bridge (1928), and the gritty landscape of the LA River. Truly a concrete jungle out here.

The eastern end of the Spring Street Bridge lies one block from the North Broadway Viaduct (1911), which is bookended by a set of elegant columns. It’s built on a grander scale than its neighbor, with a few additional decorative flourishes, like this central set of columns midway through the span. The Broadway Bridge is heavily restored and retrofitted, and although the original ornament has been duplicated, the surfaces are clearly new. It’s not really perceptible to drivers, but walking across, it was a somewhat disappointing experience seeing how “new” it was. I recognize of course that the retrofits were necessary given how seismically active the Southland is.

I turned north at Solano Avenue, heading up Solano Canyon, one of those unfortunate neighborhoods that felt the effects of the Pasadena Freeway (Arroyo Seco Parkway) in the 1940s, and then the construction of Dodger Stadium in the late 1950s. In effect, it’s been split in two by the Parkway, and the geography keeps it a rather isolated, funky enclave that’s not often visited. It seems to maintain a sense of community often lacking in an anonymous big city, let alone a very spread out big city like LA. I crossed under the freeway and then up the stairway to the walkway along the Parkway. Once you reach the LA River crossing, the sidewalk is in pretty terrible condition, pretty much a garbage dump in places, littered with broken glass. Even for a now seasoned barefooter like me, it’s a challenging place to walk safely.

Gotta tread carefully!

Gotta tread carefully!

Now at the base of the stairway, my route entered a rather forlorn part of town, passing the neglected confluence of the Arroyo Seco and LA River, the imposing, threatening presence of the Lincoln Heights Jail, and finally back to civilization at North Broadway.

Lincoln Heights Jail, I think this might be a great place to explore, anyone?

Lincoln Heights Jail, I think this might be a great place to explore, anyone?

After some lunch at Carnitas Michoacan, I continued my walk through Lincoln Heights, full of Victorian structures in various states of repair, finally reaching North Main Street at the Brewery art colony. I turned back towards Union Station. Main Street passes the last remnants of the old Italian community that used to be here, now just an Italian deli and the historic San Antonio Winery structures. It’s going the way of other historic Italian neighborhoods, like New York’s Little Italy and East Harlem, where the American melting pot finally mixed. The Main Street Bridge (1910), the oldest and shortest of the LA River spans, leads into an industrial neighborhood on one side, and the World War II-era, International style William Mead Houses (1942), aka Dogtown, on the opposite side. Despite the reputation of public housing, this appears to be a vital and well-kept public housing project.

Lincoln Heights funkiness

Lincoln Heights funkiness

The next set of bridges are in downtown proper, starting with the Macy Street Bridge, now Cesar Chavez Street Bridge. Stay tuned.

Los Angeles River bridge walk

The LA River cuts through the eastern edge of downtown Los Angeles, deep in a concrete jungle of warehouses, trendy lofts, America’s largest Skid Row, and some of the busiest commercial areas of the city. A series of historic bridges were built in the early 20th century, to provide essential infrastructure, but also to re-build after disastrous flooding along the river. The channel itself was covered in concrete mid-century, so very few traces of the wooded, meandering river still exist.

Downtown, from north to south, it starts with the complex of bridges of the Arroyo Seco Parkway and the unusual sidewalk that straddles the northbound and southbound lanes of the 110. I’ve written about that in a previous post. South of this are the Broadway, Spring, North Main, Cesar Chavez, 1st, 4th, 6th, 7th, Olympic Blvd., and Washington Blvd. bridges, ranging from the modest to the grand, built between 1905 and 1933. They’re perhaps the most hidden and underappreciated structures of the city, beautifully detailed, but mercilessly spray painted, graffitied, and covered in trash. They are also the most viewed structures in the city, appearing in countless commercials and movies. Seismically, they were built before current earthquake code, and many aspects of the bridges have been modified, or copied, or widened. So in classic LA fashion, they look unchanged from a distance, but up close, the changes, makeup, and restoration really show. The development of the Arts District on the west side of the river and the slow gentrification of Boyle Heights on the east, has brought the bridges back in focus, and they are busy creative spaces. It’s easy to find a fashion or film shoot going on at any hour, but also easy to find solitary, creepy zones.

I put together a route that links the bridges in downtown LA, which can be found in the link below, and walked them in June 2015. I’ll try to post on my walk in a future entry on this blog. Happy exploring!