Archive for December, 2017|Monthly archive page

Summer of 14ers, 2017

Well, I burned out on them this year. It was inevitable, as I had hiked more than 35 of them solo, and I got increasingly tired of the driving. So I did still manage to add a few new ones to my list, and repeated several of them on new routes. Overall, it was a good, although not as enjoyable, summer. I still got in plenty of eye candy, exercise, and experience.

My season started with a hike of a still snowy Quandary Peak in mid-June. I wasn’t intending on summiting, and hiked this one up barefoot to around the 13400′ line, and turned around there since it was snowy from there on up.

The following week I hiked the Bierstadt / Sawtooth / Evans combo. I had been up Bierstadt before, and had driven up Evans previously. This one reminded me of how out of shape I was, and my energy level went to near zero after passing the Sawtooth section. Now this was a pretty spectacular hike, a bit exposed and loose in places, but the route was fairly clear, and I was luckily with a small group. I don’t recommend it on your own, though. I also ended up hitching back to Georgetown from the summit of Evans, as I was completely spent and cold from the wind. Good thing, too, as I could avoid the swampy mess in the lower part of Bierstadt. This hike was also notable in that I hiked up Bierstadt barefoot, and it’s an excellent trail. The muddy and wet section at the beginning was manageable, and the remainder of the trail was pretty smooth going. It’s fairly gentle on the feet, even though I still crossed a few small patches of snow. Not bad, check one off my list!

I also repeated Yale, this time on the far less traveled East Ridge route. It’s a fairly straightforward trail up to the saddle, then a sharp left turn and up along a poorly marked trail the rest of the way. It’s really no problem routefinding, but there were a few longer snowfields around some of the subpeaks that slowed me down. We descended via the standard route. My previous hike of Yale was on a rather foggy day, so this time around I managed to actually see my surroundings and the view was pretty good.

Up next was Mount of the Holy Cross, which was honestly one of the better peaks in this rather dull range. It’s way out there, just a few miles south of I-70, and hidden from view. Access on the road is limited, it doesn’t open until late June, and it’s a rough but passable road that goes by the Tigiwon structures, then dead ends at a crowded parking lot. This one saw plenty of traffic, and it’s a pretty hike from beginning to end, just don’t miss the sharp right turn that you need to make on the way back down. Also, save your energy for the 900 feet of ascent required to get out of the canyon on the way back. I took my time and it’s pretty manageable. I caught it on a warm, perfect day.

Mt. Harvard was my Sawatch finisher. I was denied this peak last October due to snow, cold temperatures, and exhaustion, missing the summit by a few hundred feet and a quarter mile via the Columbia traverse. This time I just hiked the standard trail, which is clear up to the last 200 feet or so. It’s a bit of boulder hopping from that point on, but there’s plenty of traffic and help in that short section. This was my debut hike in Chacos, which didn’t quite agree with my feet. It’s also 14 miles long, so no wonder it wasn’t so enjoyable.

The last “easy” peak on my list was San Luis, and I have to admit that I rather enjoyed this one, hiking the southern approach via the Creede side. It turned out to be somewhat longer than I thought, since I couldn’t make it all the way to the official trailhead, and made a few detours en route to joining the Colorado Trail. Most of the hike is on the Colorado Trail as it approaches the peak in slow motion, winding around one basin after another before hitting the ridgeline. It was scenic, very quiet, with plenty of green, lots of wildflowers, and real serenity. This one clocked out at 18 miles round-trip, another punishing outing in Chacos. They didn’t really break in much!

I spent a couple weeks on business trips in July and August, and returned to hike Wilson Peak. It’s relatively short, but has a rather exposed, challenging end. This was real scrambling, with real consequences. I felt this was harder than its neighbor, El Diente, that I hiked the previous summer, although El Diente had more routefinding. The trail to Wilson Peak from Rock of Ages trailhead is essentially two old mining roads that were joined together, and that quickly brings you to the 13200′ mark. After that, it’s much slower going, with a faint trail to another saddle, and then the real stuff starts. It’s mostly okay up until the false summit, and then it’s a thrilling 200′ to the real peak. Have you heard of this peak? Probably not, but it’s on every can of Coors Light and stands proudly apart from the other peaks in that region. Incidentally, the view featured on that beer can is what you see from Telluride ski area.

I also had one failed summit, which was this awful slog up Ellingwood Point. The clouds turned me back around 13500′, which was a real bummer especially after hiking from my parking spot at 7700′. I probably could have made it up if I had parked a bit higher at 8000′, and that would have saved me two miles of walking. I think that really left a sour taste in my mouth, as I spent nearly 11 hours on Lake Como Road, which isn’t the most scenic or calm way to get up there.

Notably, I made a few changes to my footwear choice this season. Yes, I hiked a 14er barefoot, and have been conditioning my feet to deal with more and more difficult terrain, so it’s a part of my hiking repertoire. Of course it’s not practical for a lot of hikes. My old trail running shoes have more or less crumbled after 30+ 14ers, and I’ve switched to a pair of approach shoes that have been irritating to my Achilles for some reason. So with that in mind, I also did a few of these hikes in Chacos, those rather distinct, heavy, indestructible sandals that seem to work in every kind of condition. I ended up hiking Harvard, San Luis, and part of Wilson Peak in those sandals, and yes, they work pretty well. My feet aren’t yet used to them, even though I’ve done probably at least 50 miles to try to break them in.

Hopefully next summer my energy and desire will return, as my remaining 14ers are the difficult ones, in the Elks, San Juans, and Sangres.

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