Archive for April, 2013|Monthly archive page

Copenhagen Airport

Another little post from my recent travels. Copenhagen has a beautiful airport to look at, at least parts of it. Terminal 2 is Danish design at its best, designed by architect Vilhelm Lauritzen, and completed in April 1960, the building features a memorably functional scheme, simple on the outside, and lighted on the inside by these circular skylights. Although the airport has now been expanded, with the addition of the sweeping Terminal 3 and associated rail station, the 1960 structure has aged remarkably well. Also of note is Pier A, which is a calm, although overly long concourse, with nifty arches a bit like a cathedral, not that airports are ever cathedrals.

Terminal 2, exterior, well-done Modernism.

Terminal 2, exterior, well-done Modernism.

Terminal 2, circles and circles, a great space.

Terminal 2, circles and circles, a great space.

And more circles. . .

And more circles. . .

The additions and shopping mall airside are another matter, they contribute to a chaotic, cacophonous visual spectacle, but this is the modern airport these days, resembling more of a shopping mall than a transportation hub. Still, with the wood floors and warm tones, Copenhagen’s airport outdoes pretty much everything in the US, and is comparable to the best of the European airports, Munich, Zurich, Schiphol.

Terminal 3

Terminal 3

And upon exiting the baggage claim and customs, a great way of entering a great city.

And upon exiting the baggage claim and customs, a great way of entering Denmark.

Concourse A, it just takes forever to get there and get out of there, though.

Concourse A, it just takes forever to get there and get out of there, though.

The layout for the traveler is a bit confusing, though. Security lines are centralized, and quite congested. And after all that, you are spilled out into a duty free mall, so going through here is no relaxing experience, but far better than going through other European hubs like Frankfurt, Heathrow, and de Gaulle.

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Innsbruck, Austria

So I hit the roads and skies for a few weeks. Innsbruck has always been one of my favorite places to visit, a city of 150,000-ish people squeezed into a narrow valley between mighty mountains. It’s a strategic location, along a river, and at the foot of the Brenner Pass, the lowest pass between Austria and Italy. So there’s more than a hint of Italian flavor, mixed in with a large student population, and all sorts of outdoorsy folks hitting the slopes or trails on their lunch breaks. My kind of town indeed. It has that combination of history and beauty, while remaining a real city with its gritty corners and less beautiful neighborhoods. It’s authentic, in other words, fitting for the main city and administrative center in the Tyrol (Tirol).

I normally take the train, but this time I flew in and out, and having taken 500+ flights in my lifetime, this one is special. The flight paths pretty much graze the Alps at barely over 3000 meters, so you’re really up close and personal with the mountains for the first or last 10 minutes of flight. So here you go, some mountain porn for your viewing pleasure.

On the way in, just past the Zugspitze.

On the way in, just past the Zugspitze.

Around the Germany / Austria border

Around the Germany / Austria border

Also around the Germany / Austria border

Also around the Germany / Austria border

From the Patscherkofel looking up the Stubaital

From the Patscherkofel looking up the Stubaital

No architecture in this post, maybe I’ll write another one about the numerous interesting structures in town, along with some of the urban stuff.